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Buttons

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In Ancient Rome and Greece, they fastened clothes not only with fibulas, but also with buttons. Such a simple everyday item was common among the most diverse strata of the population: the military fastened penulas with buttons , women from noble families buttoned tunics and tunics on top, thereby creating some semblance of sleeves.

Fragment of a legionnaire's tombstone in a button-down penule. Found in the vicinity of London. 1-2 century AD
A woman in a buttoned tunic. Herculaneum. 79 A.D.
Statue of Vibia Sabina in a tunic with buttons. Paris, Louvre Museum. Inv. No. MR 316. 2nd century AD

Archaeological findings confirm the use of buttons in antiquity. Many buttons were found, mostly made of copper-containing alloys. Wooden buttons are also possible. Buttons probably served not only for fastening fabrics, but also as jewelry.

Bronze buttons from Pompeii. 1st century AD

Related topics

Women in Ancient Rome, Penula, Tunic, Fibula

Gallery

Buttons. Vindonissa Museum. Switzerland. 1st century AD
A button with a thin triangular protrusion. The front side of the disk is decorated with an enamel pattern. Chester. England. 2nd century AD
Bronze button from Pompeii. 1st century AD
Bronze buttons. Found in Egypt. 1-2 century AD
Bronze buttons. Found in Egypt. 1-2 century AD
Bronze buttons. Found in Egypt. 1-2 century AD
Roman button with enamel. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 2nd-4th century AD
Bronze button. Private collection. 1st century BC
Bronze button. Private collection. 1st century BC
Bronze button. Private collection. 1st century BC
Bronze button. Private collection. 1st century BC